knitonthenet

Learning a Lesson

A couple of days ago I was rooting through my freezer for something to defrost for yesterday’s lunch. I fancied some soup and after looking for a little while found what I was sure was a little container full of yummy miso soup with mushrooms and sweetcorn.

So, yesterday, at lunchtime I was all set to eat said soup (with the addition of some fresh beansprouts – yum). Well. Except what I thought was the lovely miso soup was actually some kind of vegetable and unrecognisable meat stew combo. Really not what I was expecting.

I bet you’re wondering why I’m telling you this, aren’t you?

Well, I did somewhat the same thing with a UFO a little while ago. ‘Yes’, I thought, having stashed away this particular cardigan for a year because I found more new and exciting things to knit, ‘this cardi is just the thing and I have lots of the yarn left, so let’s get on with it.’

That bit there, the ‘I have lots of the yarn left’ part… well, I had lots of yarn left that looked like the same yarn. In the semi-darkness. While I was watching TV and not paying a huge amount of attention.

You can’t see it so well from this picture, but the bottom half and part of the arms are a rather different shade of red. Not just a different dyelot, but an entirely different colourway. To add insult to injury, I realised that I’d knitted another cardigan for my Mum in the yarn left from this one, instead of the newer, differently-shaded yarn that I had bought especially for it. The upshot of it was that my red cardigan was frogged.

This is the point where you say, ‘…but Ingrid, you seem like a quite well organised person. Don’t you keep a little notebook with all the details of each project, or do the same on Ravelry?’ Er, well I do now! Quite obviously I didn’t before, but the Red Cardigan of Doom has taught me a lesson. It is one that I’ll be extending to my cooking life as well now.

Without sounding like a public information advert, if this is a problem that you have yourself, Ravelry has great options on their project pages to add in the yarn and needles you are using and even the shade and dyelot. Brenda Dayne also gave some great advice on how she keeps record cards for each project she makes a while back on Cast On (I’m really sorry that I can’t find the actual episode).

Another extra, but really useful thing that you could do alongside keeping ‘real life’ notes in a book or card system is to keep some of the yarn that you used for mending. Even better (and to follow a wartime tradition) you could make the buttons for your garment by knitting them and stuffing them with the yarn, so there is always some available and it will have been washed to the same extent.*

So, after the fiasco of the miso soup and the frogging of the Red Cardigan of Doom, the moral of the story is: keep proper records of your stuff, people: you won’t regret it!

(cross published from the knitonthenet blog)

*Thanks to Jane Waller and Susan Crawford for that great advice!

PS I ended up having a marmite sandwich and a banana, if you were wondering.

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Venta

Issue 9 of Knit on the Net went live a couple of weeks ago, and I have an article about the Knitting Reference Library, a couple of book reviews and  most excitingly, a pattern too!

This neck warmer was inspired by a pub discussion about the perfect scarf / neck warmer which could keep your face, neck and décolletage warm in one garment. It uses the Roman Rib stitch pattern to create stretch and texture. Knitted flat, it fastens with 23 buttons which can be done up all the way for protection against icy winds or alternatively some buttons can be left open to create a collar, as seen in the picture. It can be worn with or without a coat, in place of a scarf and is a unisex pattern. Although fitting much like a cowl around the neck, the ribbing pattern allows it to stay in place.

Issue 10, The Comfort Issue has lots of other stuff to read and includes some really good patterns: go take a look.


Knit a Poppy Campaign 2009

As you might know, I’m editorial assistant at knitonthenet.com.

We have just announced the 2009 Knit a Poppy campaign in support of The Poppy Appeal.

The background to this appeal is that the Royal British Legion provides financial, social and emotional support to millions who have served and are currently serving in the Armed Forces, and their dependants. Currently, nearly 10.5 million people are eligible for their support and they receive thousands of calls for help every year. The British Legion’s annual Poppy Appeal is one of the ways in which they raise money for their work.

Poppy Brooch designed by Just call me Ruby ©knitonthenet

Poppy Brooch designed by Just call me Ruby ©knitonthenet

Please visit knitonthenet to download our elegant poppy brooch pattern (designed by Just call me Ruby) by making a donation of £2.00 to The Poppy Appeal.

We shall be keeping you updated of the Knit a Poppy Campaign via theknitonthenet blog and website, Ravelry forum and Facebook page. We would love to see photographs of your finished brooches and also hear how much money you have raised.

Please email me the details at ingrid(at)knitonthenet(dot)com.