Archive for April, 2010

Spring Greens Scarf

Inspired by all of the lovely spring flowers that are starting to bloom, and the beautiful green foliage bursting to life everywhere, I decided to knit up a simple scarf. It is made using some great recycled sari fabric yarn which I bought on my recent trip to Prick Your Finger. Combining it with my beloved apple green 4-ply alpaca which wasn’t ultimately any good for my Sun Ray Ribbing, I made a simple scarf which is light enough to be worn still in the spring and will come into its own again in the autumn.

It is a super-simple pattern knitted entirely in garter stitch on large needles for a light and airy feel and to show off the sari yarn to its best advantage.

You will need:

2 x artesano 100% alpaca 4-ply yarn (I used the colourway Brazil)

1 skein (of approx 150g of recycled sari fabric yarn or a similar accent yarn in a heavier weight than the 4-ply

7mm; 100cm circular needles

Tip: The recycled sari yarn knits up at approximately DK to aran weight.

Gauge: 5 stitches  and 7 rows per inch in garter stitch

The tension isn’t vital on this pattern, as it is a simple scarf, but the sari fabric yarn shows up better on a looser gauge and the alpaca drapes nicely at  this tension. Use larger of smaller needles if you need.

Abbreviations:

K: knit

MC: main colour; alpaca yarn

CC: complimentary colour; sari yarn

Pattern:

Using MC, cast on 180 stitches using the longtail cast on method (for stretch).

*MC: Knit 5 rows garter stitch. Do not cut yarn or fasten off at end.

CC: Knit 1 row and cut leaving a 5″ tail at the end

Swap ends and start work again using MC from where you last left off*

Repeat the pattern from * to * 12 times.

Next: Using MC, knit 5 rows in garter stitch and cast off very loosely.

Weave in the cut ends of the sari ribbon yarn and the ends of the alpaca.

Block . Or don’t block. You choose…

Wear it!

Please feel free to knit up this scarf to keep or as gifts/charity fundraising, but please do not knit up for commercial purposes or reproduce the pattern without first seeking permission.

Thank you to Giles for taking the top photograph!

Copyright © Ingrid Murnane 2010. All rights reserved.


Venta

Issue 9 of Knit on the Net went live a couple of weeks ago, and I have an article about the Knitting Reference Library, a couple of book reviews and  most excitingly, a pattern too!

This neck warmer was inspired by a pub discussion about the perfect scarf / neck warmer which could keep your face, neck and décolletage warm in one garment. It uses the Roman Rib stitch pattern to create stretch and texture. Knitted flat, it fastens with 23 buttons which can be done up all the way for protection against icy winds or alternatively some buttons can be left open to create a collar, as seen in the picture. It can be worn with or without a coat, in place of a scarf and is a unisex pattern. Although fitting much like a cowl around the neck, the ribbing pattern allows it to stay in place.

Issue 10, The Comfort Issue has lots of other stuff to read and includes some really good patterns: go take a look.


Jeeves and Wooster Socks

One of the Jeeves and Wooster socks. Image © Giles Babbidge Photography

This pair of socks is part of the Mrs Miniver series. I decided to branch out on the original Mrs Miniver concept, and to knit a series of socks that would encapsulate the essence of literary characters and talk about their relationships. As I’m sure you are aware, Jeeves is the ‘gentleman’s gentleman’, the idle-rich 1930s playboy Bertie Wooster’s valet in P.G. Wodehouse’s series of books. Bertie can certainly be a bit of a prat, rather unable to look after himself and getting himself into all kinds of mischief. He is constantly reliant on Jeeves to sort everything out for him from the daily basics, on up.

I found a great pattern in the Knitting Reference Library for a 1930s Wonder-Sock which really is a marvellous thing. The toes and heels of the sock are knitted separately and joined on in order that they could be easily replaced and thus saving on darning time. I think Jeeves would approve.  His part of each sock is, of course, knitted in black wool. None of Bertie’s ‘jolly purple socks’ for him!

From P. G Wodehouse’s The Inimitable Jeeves, p94-5

He started to put out my things, and there was an awkward sort of silence.

‘Not those socks, Jeeves,’ I said, gulping a b it but having a dash at the careless, off-hand tone. ‘Give me the purple ones.’

‘I beg your pardon, sir?’

‘Those jolly purple ones.’

‘Very good sir.’

He lugged them out of the drawer as if he were a vegetarian fishing a caterpillar out of the salad. You could see that he was feeling it deeply.

You can see the exhibition Mrs Miniver and the Plateaknits at Prick Your Finger yarn and haberdashery shop in Bethnal Green, London until the end of April.


Mrs Miniver and the Plateaknits

Friendsocks © Giles Babbidge Photography.

I currently have an exhibition on at Prick Your Finger which is a brilliant and quirky yarn and haberdashery shop in Bethnal Green in London.

I’m showing both the Mrs Miniver series of socks which talk about relationships between people, and also the final pieces from the #plateaknit performance in January.

Setting up the Plateaknits © Giles Babbidge Photography

I went up to London last Wednesday to put the show up with lots of help from Giles who was also kind enough to document it all for me. Rachael and Louise and their shop staff were lovely and made us very welcome with cups of tea throughout the day and put on a great private view in the evening.

Mrs Miniver and the Plateaknits © Giles Babbidge Photography

I will be posting over the coming weeks to give a little more insight about  some of the Mrs Miniver socks and the #plateaknit project, so look out for those blog posts.

The exhibition is on for the rest of April, so if you are in London, please do visit and let me know what you think.

PS My lovely chap, Giles took all of the photographs for me. Please do visit his site here.